In preparation for April 23rd’s Start-up City Conference,

In preparation for April 23rd’s Start-up City Conference, I asked some friends to suggest ways that fast, reliable internet service would help businesses. Doc Searls sent a reply that’s worth reposing (you can read more at his blog):

Fast and reliable infrastructure of any kind is good for business. That it’s debatable for the Internet shows we still don’t understand what the Internet is — or how, compared to what it costs to build and maintain other forms of infrastructure, it’s damned cheap, with economic and social leverage in the extreme.

Here’s a thought exercise for the audience: Imagine no Internet: no data on phones, no ethernet or wi-fi connections at home — or anywhere. No email, no Google, no Facebook, no Skype.

That’s what we would have if designing the Internet had been left up to phone and cable companies, and not to geeks whose names most people don’t know, and who made something no business or government would ever contemplate: a thing nobody owns, everybody can use and anybody can improve — and for all three reasons supports positive economic externalities beyond calculation.

The only reason we have the carriers in the Net’s picture is that we needed their wires. They got into the Internet service business only because demand for Internet access was huge, and they couldn’t avoid it.

Yet, because we still rely on their wires, and we get billed for their services every month, we think and talk inside their conceptual boxes.

Try this: cities are networks, and networks are cities. Every business, every person, every government agency and employee, every institution, is a node in a network whose value increases as a high multiple of all the opportunities there are for nodes to  connect — and to do anything. This is why the city should care about pure connectivity, and not just about “service” as a grace of phone and cable companies.

Building a network infrastructure as neutral to purpose as water, electricity, roads and sewage treatment should be a top priority for the city. It can’t do that if it’s wearing blinders supplied by Verizon, Time Warner and AT&T.

Re-base the questions on the founding protocols of the Net itself, and its city-like possibilities. Not on what we think the carriers can do for us, or what we can do that’s carrier-like.

Internet Everywhere: The Role & Policy Implications of Public Wi-Fi in NYC

On April 11, our own Joe Plotkin appeared on a panel at the event  Internet Everywhere: The Role & Policy Implications of Public Wi-Fi in NYC. Our friend Joly MacFie was kind enough record it. Speakers included Council Member Gale Brewer, NYC officials Deirdre Flynn and Bruce Regal, reps from the ACLU and Time Warner, and more. The moderator was Nilay Patel, managing editor of The Verge.

Start-up City Conference: Growing New York City’s Entrepreneurial Ecosystem for All

This Friday, April 26, 2013, I will be appearing on a panel at the Manhattan Borough President Scott M. Stringer’s “Start-up City” conference:

Start-up City Conference

Breakout Session III: Infrastructure for the 21st Century—How Fast, Reliable Internet Access Can Boost Business Throughout the Five Boroughs

Time: 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM

Panelists:

  • Susan Crawford, Professor, Cardozo School of Law
  • Dana Spiegel, Founder and Executive Director, NYCWireless
  • Andrew Kimball, CEO, Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corp.
  • Charles Davidson, Director, Advanced Communications Law & Policy Institute, NYLS
  • Lourdes Zapata, Senior Vice President, South Bronx Overall Economic Development Corporation

Moderator:

  • Mitchell Moss, Professor of Urban Policy and Planning, NYU

Share Your Network–Join New Open Wireless Movement

New Project Promotes Shared Open Wi-Fi with Tips and How-Tos

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and a coalition of nine other groups launched the Open Wireless Movement today–a new project to promote a landscape of shared, wireless Internet.

The Open Wireless Movement site at openwireless.org gives users of all kinds technological and legal information around opening up a wireless network, including how-to guides and responses to common myths. The site includes specialized information for households, small businesses, developers, and Internet Service Providers. The Open Wireless Movement coalition is also working to develop router technology making it easier for people to open their networks without losing quality of Internet access or compromising security.

“We envision a world where sharing one’s Internet connection is the norm,” said EFF Activist Adi Kamdar. “A world of open wireless would encourage privacy, promote innovation, and largely benefit the public good. And everyone–users, businesses, developers, and Internet service providers–can get involved.”

The Open Wireless Coalition consists of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Fight for the Future, Free Press, Internet Archive, NYCwireless, the Open Garden Foundation, OpenITP, the Open Spectrum Alliance, the Open Technology Institute, and the Personal Telco Project.

Newest NYCwireless Wi-Fi Hotspot is a Hotzone Covering All of DUMBO!

We are extremely excited to announce that the newest NYCwireless Wi-Fi Hotspot is actually a full Hotzone covering all of DUMBO, Brooklyn! The great folks at Two Trees and the DUMBO BID made this happen, and with our help, DUMBO now becomes the first free Wi-Fi Hotzone in NYC!

Read about it in the New York Times: Using Internet Outside? In Part of Brooklyn, Free Wireless Access Arrives

We are having a wire-cutting on Thursday at 11:30 at the Manhattan Bridge Archway, and taking the “wraps” off the Wi-Fi network. We’ll post pictures and hopefully some video of the event as soon as we can.

Wireless City: Can all New Yorkers Get Connected? Event on Mar 8 @ 6:30pm

On Tuesday, March 8, from 6:30 – 8:00PM, I will be appearing on a panel at the Municipal Arts Society’s Wireless City: Can All New Yorkers Get Connected? event. The discussion will be an engaging discussion with a number of experts in the field of Broadband and Wireless in NYC and the north-east.

Internet access, once a luxury, is quickly becoming a key livability issue for New York. Other cities have tried to implement free wifi access to all of their citizens, but with varying success. The Municipal Art Society will present a panel of experts who will explore some of the models employed, as well as the challenges in making wifi access a priority.

Together, they will address the following questions:

  • What would expanded wireless access enable New Yorkers to do better, more efficiently, and more cost effectively?
  • What is the difference between muni-wireless (as was done in Philadelphia and other cities) and public space wireless (as offered in NYC and in Montreal)?
  • What are the roles of the city government, BIDs and other organizations, and private/non-profit developers in providing free wifi?

There will also be a Keynote given by Rachel Sterne, NYC’s Chief Digital Officer, and an Introduction given by one of our favorite people, City Councilmember Gale Brewer.

Be sure to register at http://wirelesscitymasnyc.eventbrite.com/

Bringing Wi-Fi to Public Spaces in NYC

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 101 other followers